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KNEE REPLACEMENT

Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to be more active. Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not helping you anymore.

After a knee replacement, there are many activities that you can reasonably expect to be able to do after knee surgery: recreational walking, swimming, driving, biking, ballroom dancing, stair climbing. However, you will no longer be able to do certain activities, such as jogging and high-impact sports.

Benefits of knee replacement includes elimination of pain, renewed stability and movement, improved range of motion, correction of deformities, and quality of life improvement. Most patients are pain-free and able to bend their knees from 90° to 100°, resuming daily activities without restriction.

Who Need It?


Knee replacement candidates are often between the age ranges of 65-75, mainly because patients are likely to keep the knee prosthesis for the rest of their lives (15-20 years).

New techniques allow for an implant to be removed and replaced, but our goal is to be able to implant a prosthesis that will last the patient a lifetime without revision.

If you have symptoms such as pain, crepitus; stiffness limping, limitation of motion, and swelling where anti inflammatory drugs or other pain killers are not working, knee replacement surgery may be the right therapy to regain deisred motility


The Treatment


Patients should be prepared to spend around 3-5 days in the medical center; it depends on the speed of recovery. During that time, you are going to be visited by physical therapists that will be educated on physical exercises.

Physiotherapy is very important after the operation for optimum benefit of treatment. Active and passive exercises will be started as early as posiible.Physiotherapy procedures and duration of sessions will depend on the technique used and your recovery status.


Important points/Adverse Effects?


Absolute contraindications to total knee replacement include, knee sepsis including previous osteomyelitis, a remote source of ongoing infection, extensor mechanism dysfunction, severe vascular disease, recurvatum deformity secondary to muscular weakness, and the presence of a well functioning knee arthrodesis.
Relative contraindications include medical conditions that preclude safe anesthesia, the demands of surgery and rehabilitation. Other relative contraindications include skin conditions within the field of surgery psoriasis, a neuropathic joint and obesity.

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Diagnosis and Treatment Methods


Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to be more active. Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not helping you anymore.

A total knee replacement surgery replaces all three compartments of the unhealthy knee joint. The orthopedic surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone from the surface of your knee joint and replaces them with a man-made surface of metal and plastic. In a partial knee replacement, the surgeon only replaces one part of your knee joint.

Who Need It?


Knee replacement candidates are often between the age ranges of 65-75, mainly because patients are likely to keep the knee prosthesis for the rest of their lives (15-20 years).
New techniques allow for an implant to be removed and replaced, but our goal is to be able to implant a prosthesis that will last the patient a lifetime without revision.
Symptoms of advanced end-stage knee arthritis include:

  • Pain
  • Crepitus
  • Stiffness
  • Limping
  • Muscle weakness
  • Limitation of motion, and
  • Swelling


Contraindications?


Absolute contraindications to total knee replacement include, knee sepsis including previous osteomyelitis, a remote source of ongoing infection, extensor mechanism dysfunction, severe vascular disease, recurvatum deformity secondary to muscular weakness, and the presence of a well functioning knee arthrodesis.
Relative contraindications include medical conditions that preclude safe anesthesia, the demands of surgery and rehabilitation. Other relative contraindications include skin conditions within the field of surgery psoriasis, a neuropathic joint and obesity.


Your Journey


A personal assistant supplied by Remed Assistance will welcome you at the airport, accompany you to the hospital and do the necessary translation in order to guarantee a worry-free medical trip experience in Turkey.

Preparation For The Operation


Two weeks before surgeryYou may be asked to stop taking certain medications, such as:

Aspirin, NSAIDs (Aleve, Advil), and other medications that make it more difficult for blood to clot Also steroids and other medications that suppress the immune system and therefore may increase the chance of post-surgical infection must be stopped. Do not forget to inform your physician if you are taking any of these medications

If would be better to eliminate or cut down on smoking, since nicotine impedes healing and increases the risk of post-surgical deep vein thrombosis, a potentially deadly blood clot in a deep vein

Patients who have other medical conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease, may be required to consult specialists in those areas to make sure they are able to undergo surgery

Patients who have more than 1 or 2 alcoholic drinks per day should tell their doctors, as heavy alcohol use influence the effects of anesthesia

Patients who get sick (cold, flu, fever, herpes breakout, etc.) in the days preceding a surgery should report it to their doctors

You should tell the surgeon about any medications they take, including homeopathic medications and nutritional supplements, and make sure they are safe to take before and after surgery.


Examinations


Several tests, such as blood and urine samples, anelectrocardiogram, x-rays, a physical examination and a thorough review of your medical history, may be needed to help your orthopedic surgeon plan your surgery.


The Treatment

How long is the procedure?


Patients should be prepared to spend around 3-5 days in the medical center; it depends on the speed of recovery. During that time, they are going to be visited by physical therapists that will educate them on physical exercises.


Consultation with doctor;


Your primary care doctor or an internist will conduct a general medical evaluation before surgery. This examination will assess your health and your risk for anesthesia. The results of this examination will be forwarded to your orthopedic surgeon, along with a surgical clearance.

Tell your surgeon about any medical conditions you have and about any medications you are taking. You may need to stop taking certain medications altogether, or your surgeon may recommend taking substitute medications until your surgery. Medications such as corticosteroids, insulin, and blood thinners need to be managed both before and after surgery.

Shortly before your scheduled surgery, you will probably have an orthopedic examination to review the procedure and answer any last-minute questions.

On the day of your surgery, the anesthesiologist will meet with you to discuss the type of anesthesia that will be used.

If you are planning to have any dental work done, such as an extraction or periodontal treatment, schedule it well in advance of your surgery. Due to the risk of infection, do not schedule any dental work, including routine cleanings, for several weeks after your surgery.

Notify your doctor if you come down with a fever, cold or any other illness in the week before the surgery.


Post-operation


After total knee replacement, you are usually taken to a hospital room where doctors and nurses will regularly monitor your recovery. Most patients feel sleepy and fatigued the day after surgery.

Following surgery you may be placed in a CPM (continuous passive motion) machine, which will move your knee while you are in bed. This flexion and extension of your knee will help reduce knee stiffness. You will also start daily physical therapy, which includes active and passive range of motion exercises, walking, getting yourself out of bed, and getting up from a chair.

You can expect to be given pain medication as needed. Ice also helps control pain and swelling. You may become nauseated after surgery and you should inform a nurse immediately so your medication can be changed to relieve nausea. To help keep your lungs clear, you will receive instructions about deep breathing and using a device called an incentive spirometer.

For two or three days after surgery, you may experience an elevated temperature. This is common and should not alarm you. Your doctor may suggest acetaminophen, deep breathing exercises, and spending more time out of bed. The medical staff will evaluate prolonged fevers.

As a side effect of general anesthesia you may experience flatulence and constipation after surgery. If you experience no passage of gas and stool discharge at the end of the third day please inform your physician or nurse about the situation for proper treatment of the clinical condition.

While in the hospital, you will wear tight-fitting, anti-embolism stockings that help control swelling in your legs. They are removed daily for bathing and then reapplied. Physicians usually prescribe wearing the stockings day and night for up to six weeks after surgery.

By the third or fourth day after surgery, you can usually walk freely around the hospital.

The incision usually starts to close within six days and the bandage can be removed.

You will be ready to leave the hospital when you can get in and out of bed and a chair, go up and down a few stairs, bend your knee between 70 and 90 degrees, and manage your pain with oral medication.
You should be able to fully bear weight on your leg when released from the hospital, but most patients may need to use crutches, a cane, or a walker for a few weeks until they are comfortable walking on their new knee. You will be given a prescription for pain medication and schedule a series of follow-up visits starting sometime around three and six weeks after surgery.

How long will it be before I feel normal?

You should be able to stop using your crutches or walking frame and resume normal leisure activities six weeks after surgery. However, it may take up to three months for pain and swelling to settle down. It can take up to a year for any leg swelling to disappear.

Your new knee will continue to recover up to two years after your operation. During this time, scar tissue will heal and muscles will be restored by exercise.

Even after you have recovered, it's best to avoid extreme movements or sports where there's a risk of falling, such as skiing or mountain biking. Your doctor or a physiotherapist can advise you.


Departure from airport


You will be accompanied to the airport by a personal assistance. If necessary wheelchair assistance will be arranged in the airport.
By provided flight authorization and medical report, you will take your flight to home!


Follow up


After your return, Remedhealth.com agents will be available for any future request.

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